November 19, 2020

A round table on foreign labor issues will be held in Split

first_imgThe round table will be attended by companies representing the sector in tourism and trade, which will present to us first hand the real situation in the industry. Representatives of the institutions of the Croatian Employment Service of the Split Regional Office, the Ministry of the Interior of the Split Police Department, the Croatian Pension Insurance Institute, Split Branch Office and representatives of employment agencies from Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina will also be present. The primary goal of this round table is to define the broader context of the issue, while participating in a constructive discussion and finding possible solutions through the synergy of the real sector and institutions. Preparations for the new season are in full swing, and the workforce continues to be a problem plaguing many business people. Although labor import license quotas have increased by more than 100 percent this year, to 65.100, and the trade sector is listed for the first time in the distribution of licenses, the search for seasonal workers remains problematic and the number of tourist arrivals and overnight stays is tall. The tourism sector accounts for more than 23 percent of Split-Dalmatia County’s GDP, and the trade sector accounts for more than 18.200 jobs. The Croatian Chamber of Commerce is organizing a round table on “Foreign workforce – challenges and solutions for a successful tourist season.” The round table will be held on February 26 at 11 am in the Croatian Chamber of Commerce – Split County Chamber, and you can send applications via the form HERE.last_img read more

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Council roundup: Quiet zones at railroad crossings will be much, much more expensive to construct

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (12) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +9 Vote up Vote down resident2014 85p · 305 weeks ago Surprise! Quiet zones will cost more. The city cannot afford to maintain the streets and want to assess special taxes on homeowners for street improvements. Those wanting quiet zones knew the houses were near the tracks when they purchased the properties. If they want the quiet zones, assess special taxes, and let them pay for it. They are a “want” not a “need”. The old Wellington Hospital was on South Washington and there was no whining about delays to the hospital or noise for many many years. I would feel differently if the trains were something that came after the homeowners purchased the homes, but they knew the trains were there when they bought the property. If they want quiet they can move or they can pay the special taxes needed to bring them the quiet they now “want”. Report Reply 1 reply · active 305 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Crusader Pride · 305 weeks ago resident2014 I agree with you to a point. When the Wellington Hospital was in exsistence we did not have as many trains daily as we do now. That number is going to increase even more. So to say that the trains have always been here is true but not the number we see today. SO I understand that frustration but now that the figure is more than double I think we need to work with the railroad and establish points of pickup so the tracks are not blocked. But we will stil get to hear the Horns…maybe they can teach them to toot the thing and not lay on it. Report Reply 0 replies · active 305 weeks ago +9 Vote up Vote down resident2014 85p · 305 weeks ago I still stand on you buy near tracks there could be trains (more or less). I buy on a busy street there will be traffic (maybe more, maybe less). Not the taxpayers problem. I see we are working with the RR to lessen the noise. Keep up the good work. Hope it works out for everyone…including the taxpayers and not just the neighbors. Report Reply 0 replies · active 305 weeks ago +6 Vote up Vote down Larry · 305 weeks ago There are rules by the FRA as to how long they must blow the horn before and thru the crossing. A toot won’t do the job. Report Reply 1 reply · active 304 weeks ago +10 Vote up Vote down steve · 305 weeks ago look at all the good paying jobs that the railroad provides to our local economy. our tax base needs to be supported by these trains that do make noise. i suggest people relocate away from the trains if it bothers them. from a railroad family! Report Reply 0 replies · active 305 weeks ago -2 Vote up Vote down Kip · 305 weeks ago Regardless of where you live in this town you can hear the train horns. They aren’t going anywhere & WILL continue to increase. Every citizen of Wellington would benefit from this not only from a quality of life standpoint (noise), but it would absolutely increase ALL home values regardless of where the home is located. If this town doesn’t start biting the bullet, addressing the short comings that we have this town will not gain any new residents, as potential citizens of Wellington will ultimately chose to live else where. Wellington has a heck of a lot going for it but we must continue to invest in our city or it will fail. The city is no different than a business, if you don’t invest, reinvest, & continue to grow you will not survive. Wellington has an aging population that must understand that they have been “using” (not ment in a negative way; use of streets, sewers, trash service, Lake, Schools, etc.) this city & it’s infrastructure which requires reinvestment & upgrades. The past is the past, we have no control over it & “what previous City Council(s) have or have not done, we can only control the future & make Lemonade out of the Lemons we were felt. Wellington is a great place to raise a family but unless your from here it is difficult if not next to impossible to see past all of the broken streets, broken water lines, broke down homes, etc to take that leap of faith to move your family here when there are other cities around that do offer those types of amenities. Just my 2 cents (probably more). Report Reply 0 replies · active 305 weeks ago +2 Vote up Vote down notlla · 305 weeks ago All the Railroad needs to do is ,clear the tracks at C street before stopping the train. This will open the streets to traffic ,and shut off the bells ,everybody Happy…………Simple solution to the problem. Will not cost anybody a Dime……………………………………………….. Report Reply 1 reply · active 304 weeks ago -2 Vote up Vote down SuCo Pride · 304 weeks ago Kip is absolutely right. People like to believe that not spending now is the best option, and then hide their head in the sand while the problem worsens. You don’t fix a problem by waiting to fix it, you only make it more expensive when it reaches critical mass, and you have no option but to act. Quiet Zones would make absolutely no impact on the railroad business in town from monetary and jobs standpoint. Frankly, I believe the railroad would prefer the queit zones because it eases their regulatory burdens when approaching these intersections. Kip brings up another good point in the property values in homes surrounding these railroad tracks. Traditionally, homes on the South side have a lesser property value than those in many other areas of the City, and this is something that could possibly make an impact. Increased property values = higher property tax revenue = more money to dedicated to other necessary infrastructure improvements = less burden on residents for emergency funding. With interest rates at their current level, the City could consider a financing agreement on these Quiet Zones that could possibly result in a very small, to no, impact on the resident Mill Levy increase. I think it’s certainly worthy of consideration. Report Reply 1 reply · active 304 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — If the city of Wellington wishes to go through with the construction of quiet zones at railroad crossings on the five intersections on the south side of town, it appears the costs will be significantly higher than what was previously thought.Interim City Manager Shane Shields informed the council at Tuesday night’s meeting he and two other city employees met with the design plan engineer for the proposed quiet zones from the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad office to G Street and it would cost $223,637 instead of the $100,000 or less that was previously estimated.Shields cautioned the design plans are not completed so the figures are not set in stone.This summer, a group of homeowners, living in the area near the railroad, asked the council to make the intersections into quiet zones so BNSF would not have to blow their horns when a train approaches Wellington. In turn, these intersections would be constructed in a way making it impossible for drivers and pedestrians to cross the tracks while the railroad crossing guards are down and a train is passing through (see related story here).Train horns are required by federal law to be sounded at all public crossings 24 hours a day to warn motorists and pedestrians that a train is approaching.The proposal is to build 100-foot concrete medians on the north and south side of the tracks.•••••In other news:•Council member Vince Wetta commented that BNSF train engineers are making a more concerted effort to load and unload east of the yard instead of west where they were tying up traffic. Wetta said he has received several compliments from people living in the area.Shields asked the council if he could write a letter to BNSF official thanking the engineers. There were no objections.•The council voted to reject all bids from venders for the purchase of a city utility office pickup. The board also rejected the G Street water line bids and fiberglass ductwork on Chlorine scrubber bids.•Sumner Regional Medical Center board of director Leonard Hernandez gave his monthly report to the council. He said there will be two forums concerning the upcoming sales tax vote on the hospital in November. Those forums are scheduled for Oct. 14 and Oct. 28.•Wellington Mayor Roger Stallbaumer asked about an item that was discussed at a previous meeting about Verizon Wireless looking to use the main Wellington City water tower to erect a cell phone tower. Stallbaumer asked if the water tower at Worden Park would be a more appropriate place.Shields said the company expressed the desire to only place the cell phone tower either on the main water tower at A Street or in the parking lot of a church. Since the church parking lot was in a residential area, that wouldn’t be feasible.Shields said he has sent a letter to Verizon’s for more information on their plans and the specs the city wishes the corporation to adhere to, but he has yet to hear any response from the company.Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more

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